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Sixth SSWA SDG Forum Report Sixth SSWA SDG Forum Report
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Beginner’s Manual on Digital Marketing and E-Commerce Beginner’s Manual on Digital Marketing and E-Commerce
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The world economy has grown steadily over the last decade, and globally the gender gap in the workforce is narrowing. However, this progress saw a setback by an estimated two years due to the negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many people believe successful businesses require a full-time commitment from entrepreneurs, and that part-time businesses — or those operated from home — will not be successful. The e-commerce business provides an opportunity to women entrepreneurs to start and expand their businesses while working from home along with flexible timing that enables them to create their own schedules, including managing a competing household and childcare responsibilities while participating economically. The e-commerce industry has brought the world to their doorsteps with the consumers and sellers being just one click away on the computer. The flexibility and technological ease of the internet now allows women entrepreneurs to conduct businesses entirely online. In layman’s terms, e-commerce is engaging with trade and commercial activities online through electronic devices. Therefore, all transactions conducted through a website, via email orders, or another form of electronic communication fall within the realm of e-commerce. In South Asia, there is no dearth of skills among women to manage small or medium enterprises, but rather a gap or vacuum in the technological know-how to conduct an online business. With a small boost in capacity and the efficient use of information and communication technology, women can reach new heights of entrepreneurship. A multitude of online platforms offer women entrepreneurs virtual marketplaces where they can easily market their products. This training manual aims to introduce the basic concepts of digital marketing and e-commerce so that women entrepreneurs are equipped to carry out their online businesses and achieve their business goals. This manual is a step-by-step guide on how to start an online business to provide practical, hands-on training for women entrepreneurs, and can be used in future by any entrepreneur. The manual introduces existing e-commerce platforms and demonstrates how to set up an online business. For this purpose, a live demo portal has been developed, on which it is even possible to generate orders based on enquiries. The manual includes critical components for online startups, including how to register businesses and products and link businesses to bank accounts.

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SSWA Development Papers 22-01 - Strategies to Promote Regional Power Grid Connectivity and Cross-Border Electricity Trade (CBET) SSWA Development Papers 22-01 - Strategies to Promote Regional Power Grid Connectivity and Cross-Border Electricity Trade (CBET)
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Countries of the South and South-West Asia subregion have mutual complementarities in terms of their energy resource endowments as well as their aggregate energy supply-demand patterns, providing ideal conditions for implementing CBET at the subregional level. The levels of energy integration through an interconnected power grid in the subregion has been suboptimal so far due to various constraints by way of capacity limitations and lack of political consensus. However, there have been several bilateral and plurilateral initiatives for grid connectivity and trade in electricity, which can potentially become building blocks for broader CBET in the subregion. 

This technical paper takes stock of various initiatives in the SSWA subregion for promoting power grid integration and trade in electricity with the aim of exploring framing a forward-looking agenda for CBET in the subregion. It reviews existing legal and institutional frameworks on energy cooperation under the subregional intuitions of SAARC, BIMSTEC and ECO as well as various bilateral and plurilateral power purchase agreements (PPAs) and transmission service agreements (TSAs). The paper finds that existing frameworks at the subregional level provides several valuable overarching provisions which can guide broader CBET, while bilateral PPAs and TSAs can be scaled-up for creating a transparent, mutually beneficial and market oriented regulatory environment for promoting it. However, concerted actions from all member countries are needed in adapting their respective domestic policies and practices with respect to the energy sector and in harmonizing regulations at the regional level to cater to the needs of free trade in electricity. They also need to work together to improve coordination with each other and to create a conducive institutional architecture for CBET.      
 

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Virtual launch of the Economic and Social Survey of Asia and the Pacific 2022

Submitted by NABARQUE on Mon, 28/03/2022 - 14:41
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About the event

The 2022 edition of the Economic and Social Survey of Asia and the Pacific Survey was launched last Tuesday, 12 April 2022, from 14:00 to 15:00 (Bangkok time). Published annually since 1947, the Survey provides analyses to guide policy discussion on the current and emerging socio-economic issues and policy challenges to support sustainable development in Asia and the Pacific.

The event was opened to media, policymakers, civil society, academics, researchers, and all other stakeholders in the Asia-Pacific region as well as outside of the region. 

Survey 2022 presentation

About the report

The Economic and Social Survey of Asia and the Pacific Survey 2022 discusses at length how the rapid development of Asia-Pacific economies over the past few decades has lifted millions out of poverty but the high economic growth has masked key social issues, particularly inequality, and the global financial crisis and COVID-19 pandemic have forced such issues into the mainstream.

This 75th issue of the Survey released during the auspicious occasion of ESCAP's 75th anniversary, suggests Asia-Pacific economies must prioritise inclusive growth – whereby citizens of all socio-economic groups are able to improve their livelihoods, incomes, health and education levels. An important opportunity to shift the paradigm that was missed in 2009, so it is vital that Asia-Pacific economies make full use of this post-COVID-19 rebuilding process.

 

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Mr. Mitch Hsieh, Chief, Communications and Knowledge Management Section

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Introduction to the Survey 2022 launch
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Ms. Armida Salsiah Alisjahbana, Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations and Executive Secretary of ESCAP

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Can Asia-Pacific region be the cradle of inclusive structural transformation?   

Professor Lant Pritchett, Research Director at Oxford’s Blavatnik School of Government and Fellow at the London School of Economics

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Ms. Sweta C. Saxena, Chief, Macroeconomic Policy and Analysis Section, Macroeconomic Policy and Financing for Development Division

Mr. Hamza Ali Malik, Director, Macroeconomic Policy and Financing for Development Division

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Presentation on the 2022 Economic and Social Survey of Asia and the Pacific
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Moderated by Mr. Mitch Hsieh, Chief, Communications and Knowledge Management Section

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General

The sixth session of the Committee on Transport is scheduled to be held from 12 to 13 November 2020.

The secretariat is monitoring the rapidly evolving situation with regard to the COVID-19 outbreak and is putting into place measures to mitigate public health risks associated with mass gatherings. The secretariat continues to receive guidance from the World Health Organization, the authorities of the host country of ESCAP and the United Nations Secretariat.

Decisions on the schedule and modality of the Committee session to ensure the safety and well-being of all participants will be communicated as soon as practicable.

Credentials

Delegations are kindly requested to submit letters of credentials to Mr. Weimin Ren, Director, Transport Division, ESCAP, United Nations Building, Rajadamnern Nok Avenue, Bangkok 10200, Thailand, Fax: (66-2) 288-1067, 288-3050, at their earliest convenience prior to 1 October 2018.. Letters of credential should be addressed to the Executive Secretary of the ESCAP and emailed to [email protected].

Members of delegations are kindly reminded to bring official identification with them, duly signed by the appropriate authorities of their respective Governments/Agencies/Organizations, and provide them to the Secretariat staff at the registration counter located on the ground floor of the UNCC along with a copy of the letter of credentials indicating their appointment to the delegation.

Registration and identification badges

Participants are requested to register and obtain a visitor’s badge with ID picture on the first day of the meeting, i.e. Monday, 19 November 2018 between 08.00 hours and 09.00 hours. This is done at the Registration Counter located on the ground floor of the UNCC. Participants who are not able to register during the time indicated above are requested to do so immediately upon their arrival at UNCC and before going to the conference room. This procedure is important for security reason and will also ensure that all participants’ names appear on the list of participants.

Online registration

In conformity with standard United Nations security procedures, all participants must complete a mandatory online registration at https://meetings.unescap.org/. Participants are encouraged to complete this procedure well in advance of the meeting and no later than 1 October 2018. To facilitate the process, participants are encouraged to submit their photo in advance.

For identification and security reasons, all participants are requested to wear their meeting badges at all times when on the United Nations compound, and also during the meeting and at social functions. The loss of a meeting badge should be communicated to the Conference Management Unit, located on the ground floor of the UNCC behind the registration counter, so that a new one can be issued immediately.

Communications

Mail intended for participants during the session should be addressed as follows:
(Name of delegate)
c/o Mr. Weimin Ren
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Transport Division
ESCAP, United Nations Building
Rajdamnern Nok Avenue
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Fax: +66.2.2883022, +66.2.2881000
E-mail address: [email protected]

Meeting documents

The secretariat has adopted a paperless approach to meetings. As a result, participants are expected to get acquainted with all the meeting documents prior to the meeting. Should participants wish hard copies of the documents, they are expected to bring them to the meeting. These documents will be made available prior to the session at www.unescap.org/events/committee-transport-fifth-session

Participants wishing to circulate any papers or literature at the meeting are requested to consult staff from the secretariat servicing the meeting for the necessary arrangements.

Daily subsistence allowance

ESCAP does not provide financial assistance for participation in the 5th session of the Committee on Transport. However, it does cover the travel expenses of officials participating in the workshop on cross-border co-deployment of fibre optic infrastructure along road and rail networks. In that regard, the following shall apply:

Depending on which of the above applies, participants whose travel is sponsored (or partly sponsored) by ESCAP will receive a DSA to cover all costs associated with their participation in the meeting, including accommodation, meals and local transport while in Bangkok. A voucher to be cashed at the bank located on the ESCAP premises will be given to participants. Participants will receive their vouchers against submittal of a copy of their passports, copy of their air-tickets and the original boarding pass(es) for the flight(s) to Bangkok. To facilitate the issuance of vouchers, eligible participants are kindly requested to come with read-made copies of their passports. To date, the DSA for Bangkok is Thai Baht 7,150 (about US$ 216). Please note that this amount is subject to change without prior notice.

Participants who are unable to stay for the entire duration of the meeting are requested to inform the secretariat as soon as possible after their arrival so that the DSA can be adjusted accordingly.

In those cases where the participation costs are borne by ESCAP, the secretariat will provide only travel and DSA as expressed and will not assume responsibility for any other expenditures, including the following:

  1. You are representing your Government only at the 5th session of the Committee on Transport: ESCAP does not provide any financial support and participation is on a self-financing basis.
  2. You are representing your Government only at the workshop on co-deployment: ESCAP provides air-ticket and Daily Subsistence Allowance (DSA) for two nights (i.e. 21 and 22 November 2018 depending on flight schedule.
  3. You are representing your Government at both the 5th session of the Committee on Transport and the workshop on co-deployment: ESCAP provides air-ticket and DSA for two nights (i.e. 21 and 22 November 2018 depending on flight schedule and participants have to cover three nights on a self-financing basis (i.e. 18 to 20 November 2018).
    1. all expenses in the home country incidental to travel abroad, including expenditure for visa, medical examination, inoculations and other such miscellaneous items and internal travel to and from the airport of arrival and departure in the home country;
    2. salary and related allowances for the participants during the period of the meeting;
    3. cost incurred by participants in respect of travel insurance, accident insurance, medical bills or hospitalization fees in connection with attending the meeting;
    4. compensation in the event of death or disability of participants in connection with attending the meeting;
    5. any loss of or damage to personal property of participants while attending the meeting or losses or damages claimed by third parties as a result of any negligence on the part of the participants;
    6. any other expenses of a personal nature, not directly related to the purpose of the meeting.
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Nepal’s fight against the second wave of COVID-19 pandemic Nepal’s fight against the second wave of COVID-19 pandemic
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The second wave of COVID-19 pandemic hit Nepal between April and July 2021 and was substantially more devastating that the first wave. As of 31 March 2021, Nepal had been cautious over the possibility of the second wave of COVID-19 pandemic. Surge in new cases in neighboring India was a cause of concern. Considering the frequent cross-border movement of people along the 1,800 km-long porous border, rising cases in India threatened to spill over into Nepal. This unfettered movement, together with continuation of political rallies, religious and social functions and other public activities where people congregate, resulted in the onset of the second wave in Nepal by mid-April 2021. This paper reviews some of the steps adopted by Nepal for curbing the second wave and policy lessons thereof.

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SSWA Development Papers 21-04 - Leveraging Regional Cooperation for Achieving the SDGs in South Asia SSWA Development Papers 21-04 - Leveraging Regional Cooperation for Achieving the SDGs in South Asia
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Greater regional development cooperation is critical for South Asia to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of SDG interventions. The subregion has been lagging in terms of its overall progress towards the SDGs. Sharing similar structural constraints and challenges including disproportionate dependency on agriculture, industrial stagnation, huge infrastructural gaps, inadequate access to public services, increasing inequalities and marginalization of the poor and vulnerable sections of the population, South Asian countries collectively reveal characteristics that calls for enhanced regional cooperation. Moreover, bound together by geography, shared natural resources, riverine systems, agro-climatic zones and consequent common environmental vulnerabilities, the subregional countries also exhibits transboundary linkages that make regional cooperation an absolute necessity. The need for greater policy coordination and collaboration is also accentuated by the socio-economic disruptions caused by the COVID-19 outbreak, which has endangered developmental gains achieved by the subregion over many years. 

This paper examines how regional cooperation could be utilized as a powerful tool to support and complement the national level SDG implementation efforts. It appraises the main areas of sustainable development that can benefit from enhanced regional cooperation and explores various ways and means to achieve it. The paper finds potential beneficial outcomes of cooperation in a wide range of policy areas including elimination of poverty and hunger, improved access to health, education and universal social protection, trade, connectivity, energy, technology, development financing and environmental sustainability. The paper further presents ways and means to strengthen and build on existing institutional, legal and regulatory frameworks for enhanced cooperation for achievement of the SDGs in South Asia.
 

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South Asia SDG Report 2021 South Asia SDG Report 2021
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South Asia’s pace of progress towards the SDGs to date has been less than adequate. The COVID-19 outbreak, which has escalated into a global humanitarian crisis responsible for erasing developmental achievements attained over many years, places more hurdles along the subregion’s sustainable development pathways. The pandemic has exposed critical development gaps and vulnerabilities particular to South Asia, exerting pervasive adverse impacts manifested across almost all the SDG indicators. 

Achieving the SDGs in South Asia calls for adopting an integrated approach to SDG implementation and post-pandemic recovery, given the commonalities between development policy priorities and considering the need to maximize the utility of limited resources to address the twin challenges.

The urgency to accelerate SDG progress necessitates that South Asia follows an implementation pathway that takes advantage of existing synergies between Goals and targets. Building on the sustainable development policy priorities identified for South Asia, the report proposes a five-point SDG action agenda. The framework includes: structural diversification of the economy oriented towards industrialization; investments in the core social sectors of education and health; expansion of social protection and basic infrastructure networks; ensuring food security, sustainable agriculture and rural development; and building capacities for clean energy and environmental sustainability. The cumulative impacts of different components of the proposed framework, with spillover effects on numerous development targets, can potentially double South Asia’s GDP by 2030 in an inclusive way, thereby providing the subregion with greater likelihood of success on the SDGs.
 

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SSWA Development Paper 21-03 SSWA Development Paper 21-03
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The global economic fallout of the coronavirus (COVID-19) health pandemic is anticipated to be far worse than anything experienced in recent history. From a range of possible outcomes, developing economies will fare far worse, with greater exposure to contractions in world trade, declines in commodity prices, loss of foreign capital inflows, etc. In fashioning appropriate macroeconomic policy responses, they will also be more thinly stretched to provide adequate resources to safeguard public health, precarious jobs and limited social security cover. Amongst developing countries, those with higher initial public debt levels need to be particularly concerned. Despite a commendable health policy response, Sri Lanka is one such country, facing the COVID-19 economic fallout with a public debt ratio of near 90% of GDP and foreign debt settlements averaging USD 4 billion in the next few years.

However, given the necessity of doing everything possible to avert a sharp economic contraction, the tolerance levels for fiscal laxity and monetary easing are much higher. Sri Lanka has leaned heavily on monetary policy interventions, including direct financing of government spending and yield curve control measures to keep borrowing costs down. Whilst these measures make possible some attractive short-term numbers in the form of a V-shaped recovery, the resilience and sustainability of that recovery process will depend on efforts to ensure that equity concerns are addressed.

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UNESCAP South and South-West Asia – COVID-19 Updates No.1 UNESCAP South and South-West Asia – COVID-19 Updates No.1
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Second wave: some facts

The second wave of COVID infections in India started in mid-March 2021 (when the long-term downward trend in daily cases reversed and started rising) and lasted for about 3 months till mid-June 2021.2 At its peak, the daily new infections reached about 400,000 (0.41 million) cases (7-days moving average) in the first week of May 2021, which was more than 4 times higher than the previous peak figure of 0.097 million cases per day observed in mid-September 2020. By 21 June 2021, the latest reported figure, average of daily new infections has fallen to about 60,000 continuing a downward trend and exhibiting waning effects of the second wave. About 62% (about 18.5 million) of the total cumulative infections in India (29.9 million as of 20 June 2021) occurred during the second wave.3 The second Covid-19 wave has also been more deadly, accounting for nearly half of the total cumulative deaths (0.38 million deaths) since January 2020.4

The unexpected surge in new daily COVID-19 infections during the second wave put immense pressure on health systems across the country, overwhelming COVID-19 care facilities and human resources acting as first responders. Critical drugs and medical oxygen were found to be insufficient to meet the sudden surge in their requirement at the peak of the second wave.5 It also exposed initially, to certain extent the lack of preparedness of Government to take actions, in case of a recurrence of second wave, however, later the Government took some quick actions to contain the infections. The mutated Delta variant (The B.1.617.2 variant of COVID-19 virus), the most common in the samples sequenced during the second wave in India, which is observed to have spread faster and therefore potentially more infectious, is deemed to have worsened rate of infection during the second wave in India.6

1 This paper has been prepared with the objective of sharing information on some good examples in controlling the effect of COVID-19 pandemic. The views expressed are purely personal and do not reflect the views of UNESCAP. The authors are also thankful to the officials from the Ministry of Health, and the Department of Commerce, Government of India, as well as researchers for their review and comments.
2 See Second wave of COVID-19 pandemic in India: Barriers to effective governmental response, Sujita Kumar Kar et al., The Lancelet, 29 May 2021.
3 See Statista: https://www.statista.com/statistics/1104054/india-coronavirus-covid-19-daily-confirmed-recovered-death-cases/
4 Ibid. Also see Indian Express: 3 lakh Covid-19 deaths in India: How far is the second wave peak?

5 See BBC: Covid-19: Has India's deadly second wave peaked?
6 See The Print: Delta variant behind India’s 2nd wave, 7 strains circulating in & around Varanasi, study finds.

 

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Side Event with APDIM: Sand and Dust Storms Risk Assessment in Asia and the Pacific: Potential for Concerted Action at Regional Level to Reduce Risk and Strengthen Resilience

Submitted by ABAHRAMI1 on Mon, 16/08/2021 - 17:12
Event Background

BACKGROUND

Sand and dust storms have a large-scale impact and affect a range of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) related to human health, productivity, agriculture, and infrastructure (transport). The findings of the Sand and Dust Storms Risk Assessment in Asia and the Pacific of the Asian and Pacific Centre for the Development of Disaster Information Management (APDIM) indicate that a high number of people living in South, South-West and Central Asia are exposed from medium to high level of dust which can have short and long-term negative impact on human health. Sand and dust storms also have wide-ranging negative impact on various socio-economic sectors including agriculture, aviation, and energy.

The deposition of dust on glaciers induces a warming effect, increasing the melting rate of ice. Along with the effects of climate change, dust deposition is a vital component of change to these essential sources of water, with direct and indirect impact on society through numerous issues, including food security, energy production, agriculture, water stress and flood regimes.

Reducing the harmful impact of sand and dust storms as part of disaster risk reduction and resilience-building efforts are interrelated and can help advance the progress being made for achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030.  Given the frequent transboundary impact of sand and dust storms, there is a strong case for the design and implementation of well-coordinated actions at the national, regional, and interregional levels.

The urgency and importance to build regional cooperation to combat slow-onset disasters is clear in a number of the United Nations General Assembly and ESCAP resolutions adopted in recent years. Some of these resolutions requested the ESCAP Secretariat to support and facilitate disaster risk assessment to strengthen regional cooperation mechanisms as well as to combat the negative impact of sand and dust storms.  

In this context and as a member of the United Nations Coalition on Combating Sand and Dust Storms, APDIM is organizing a side-event during the seventh session of the ESCAP Committee on Disaster Risk Reduction to launch the Sand and Dust Storms Risk Assessment in Asia and the Pacific and discuss how coordinated regional action on sand and dust storms can contribute to combating the negative impact of this transboundary challenge.

Objectives

APDIM side event at the seventh session of the ESCAP Committee on Disaster Risk Reduction will launch the Report on the Sand and Dust Storms Risk Assessment in Asia and the Pacific and will focus on its outcomes and recommendations to strengthen partnership and promote cooperation and coordination in the region. The side event seeks for a deeper understanding of the socio-economic impact of sand and dust storms; coordinated monitoring and early warning systems, particularly impact-based forecasting; and coordinated actions in most at-risk and exposed geographical areas to mitigate the risks. The side event will bring together senior officials from Member States, international and intergovernmental organizations, and experts.

Programme and Speakers

- Opening Keynotes

  • Ms. Armida Salsiah Alisjahbana, Executive Secretary, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP)
  • Ms. Letizia Rossano, Director, Asian and Pacific Centre for the Development of Disaster Information Management (APDIM)

- Sand and Dust Storms Risk Assessment in Asia and the Pacific

  • Mr. Amin Shamseddini, Programme Officer, APDIM
  • Mr. Yoshiya Touge, Assistant Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tohoku University
  • Mr. Alexander Baklanov, Science Officer, Science and Innovation Department, World Meteorological Organization (WMO)

- Panel Discussion 

  • Mr. John Leys, Honorary Associate Professor, The Australian National University, Visiting Scientist CSIRO, Honorary Scientific Research Fellow, NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment
  • Mr. Ali Mohammad Tahmasebi Birgani, Chair of National Committee to Combat Sand and Dust Storms, Department of Environment, Islamic Republic of Iran

- Open Discussion/Question and Answer

- Wrap-up and closing of the event by APDIM Director

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APDIM Side Event at the Seventh Session of ESCAP Committee on Disaster Risk Reduction - Sand and Dust Storms Risk Assessment in Asia and the Pacific: Potential for Concerted Action at Regional Level to Reduce Risk and Strengthen Resilience
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General

The sixth session of the Committee on Transport is scheduled to be held from 12 to 13 November 2020.

The secretariat is monitoring the rapidly evolving situation with regard to the COVID-19 outbreak and is putting into place measures to mitigate public health risks associated with mass gatherings. The secretariat continues to receive guidance from the World Health Organization, the authorities of the host country of ESCAP and the United Nations Secretariat.

Decisions on the schedule and modality of the Committee session to ensure the safety and well-being of all participants will be communicated as soon as practicable.

Credentials

Delegations are kindly requested to submit letters of credentials to Mr. Weimin Ren, Director, Transport Division, ESCAP, United Nations Building, Rajadamnern Nok Avenue, Bangkok 10200, Thailand, Fax: (66-2) 288-1067, 288-3050, at their earliest convenience prior to 1 October 2018.. Letters of credential should be addressed to the Executive Secretary of the ESCAP and emailed to [email protected].

Members of delegations are kindly reminded to bring official identification with them, duly signed by the appropriate authorities of their respective Governments/Agencies/Organizations, and provide them to the Secretariat staff at the registration counter located on the ground floor of the UNCC along with a copy of the letter of credentials indicating their appointment to the delegation.

Registration and identification badges

Participants are requested to register and obtain a visitor’s badge with ID picture on the first day of the meeting, i.e. Monday, 19 November 2018 between 08.00 hours and 09.00 hours. This is done at the Registration Counter located on the ground floor of the UNCC. Participants who are not able to register during the time indicated above are requested to do so immediately upon their arrival at UNCC and before going to the conference room. This procedure is important for security reason and will also ensure that all participants’ names appear on the list of participants.

Online registration

In conformity with standard United Nations security procedures, all participants must complete a mandatory online registration at https://meetings.unescap.org/. Participants are encouraged to complete this procedure well in advance of the meeting and no later than 1 October 2018. To facilitate the process, participants are encouraged to submit their photo in advance.

For identification and security reasons, all participants are requested to wear their meeting badges at all times when on the United Nations compound, and also during the meeting and at social functions. The loss of a meeting badge should be communicated to the Conference Management Unit, located on the ground floor of the UNCC behind the registration counter, so that a new one can be issued immediately.

Communications

Mail intended for participants during the session should be addressed as follows:
(Name of delegate)
c/o Mr. Weimin Ren
Director
Transport Division
ESCAP, United Nations Building
Rajdamnern Nok Avenue
Bangkok 10200
Thailand
Fax: +66.2.2883022, +66.2.2881000
E-mail address: [email protected]

Meeting documents

The secretariat has adopted a paperless approach to meetings. As a result, participants are expected to get acquainted with all the meeting documents prior to the meeting. Should participants wish hard copies of the documents, they are expected to bring them to the meeting. These documents will be made available prior to the session at www.unescap.org/events/committee-transport-fifth-session

Participants wishing to circulate any papers or literature at the meeting are requested to consult staff from the secretariat servicing the meeting for the necessary arrangements.

Daily subsistence allowance

ESCAP does not provide financial assistance for participation in the 5th session of the Committee on Transport. However, it does cover the travel expenses of officials participating in the workshop on cross-border co-deployment of fibre optic infrastructure along road and rail networks. In that regard, the following shall apply:

Depending on which of the above applies, participants whose travel is sponsored (or partly sponsored) by ESCAP will receive a DSA to cover all costs associated with their participation in the meeting, including accommodation, meals and local transport while in Bangkok. A voucher to be cashed at the bank located on the ESCAP premises will be given to participants. Participants will receive their vouchers against submittal of a copy of their passports, copy of their air-tickets and the original boarding pass(es) for the flight(s) to Bangkok. To facilitate the issuance of vouchers, eligible participants are kindly requested to come with read-made copies of their passports. To date, the DSA for Bangkok is Thai Baht 7,150 (about US$ 216). Please note that this amount is subject to change without prior notice.

Participants who are unable to stay for the entire duration of the meeting are requested to inform the secretariat as soon as possible after their arrival so that the DSA can be adjusted accordingly.

In those cases where the participation costs are borne by ESCAP, the secretariat will provide only travel and DSA as expressed and will not assume responsibility for any other expenditures, including the following:

  1. You are representing your Government only at the 5th session of the Committee on Transport: ESCAP does not provide any financial support and participation is on a self-financing basis.
  2. You are representing your Government only at the workshop on co-deployment: ESCAP provides air-ticket and Daily Subsistence Allowance (DSA) for two nights (i.e. 21 and 22 November 2018 depending on flight schedule.
  3. You are representing your Government at both the 5th session of the Committee on Transport and the workshop on co-deployment: ESCAP provides air-ticket and DSA for two nights (i.e. 21 and 22 November 2018 depending on flight schedule and participants have to cover three nights on a self-financing basis (i.e. 18 to 20 November 2018).
    1. all expenses in the home country incidental to travel abroad, including expenditure for visa, medical examination, inoculations and other such miscellaneous items and internal travel to and from the airport of arrival and departure in the home country;
    2. salary and related allowances for the participants during the period of the meeting;
    3. cost incurred by participants in respect of travel insurance, accident insurance, medical bills or hospitalization fees in connection with attending the meeting;
    4. compensation in the event of death or disability of participants in connection with attending the meeting;
    5. any loss of or damage to personal property of participants while attending the meeting or losses or damages claimed by third parties as a result of any negligence on the part of the participants;
    6. any other expenses of a personal nature, not directly related to the purpose of the meeting.
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